Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer awareness month

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Here’s what you can do to make a difference:

Preventing Breast Cancer:

There really is no way to completely prevent cancer, but by living an active and healthy lifestyle you can reduce your risk of getting cancer.

It is also important to also know your genetic history in order to access your risk. If there is a history of breast cancer in your family it is important to stay aware and get regular screenings. You can also get genetic testing done to see if you have the genetic mutation.

You should also limit your alcohol intake.

Practice Early Detection:

Early detection is the key to surviving breast cancer. In fact, the 5-year survival rate for cancer that is detected early is 98.5%. This is why it is important for women 40 and older to get their annual mammograms. Women in their 20-30s should get a mammogram about once every 3 years. It is important to talk to your doctor and remember to go for screenings.

How to Help Others:

One of the best ways to help other people is to talk about getting cancer screenings and reminding others to go for screenings. Simply talking to your family and friends about going for cancer screenings, and living a healthy lifestyle is the best way to treat and prevent cancer. You can also donate or start your own fundraiser that goes to cancer research. Some people enjoy selling cancer awareness wristbands which can help to raise extra funding for the charity. Getting people to wear these rubber bracelets can also bring more and more attention to the cause. These can be bought from somewhere like SleekWristbands.com for example. The money made from the sale of these can then be donated to breast cancer research. This is a great way of helping others, as it can be done in your own time and as often or as little as you like. However, the impact of selling these wristbands is huge. Alternatively, you can also volunteer in order to educate people about early detection.

Finally, if someone you know is diagnosed with breast cancer you can help by simply being there for them. Sit with them during treatment, be supportive and help in anyway that they need. One resource comes from the National Breast Cancer Organization: http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/nbcf-programs/beyond-the-shock

Sources:

http://www.ahrq.gov/professionals/clinicians-providers/guidelines-recommendations/guide/section2.html#brscreen

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/alcohol

http://www.cancer.org/healthy/toolsandcalculators/remind-me

http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-cancer-awareness-month

http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/breast.html